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JGSDF – Where Are They Now?

As far as is possible, this section will provide the latest information on the whereabouts of surviving examples of withdrawn JGSDF aircraft, which can be found in places far removed from the cosseted shelter of aviation museums. Divided into fixed-wing and helicopter types, the information comes in the form of tables that are being interspersed with a growing number of photos. 

UH-1H 41700 nestles in the bucolic setting of the Fujisan Juku no Mori Park in Shizuoka
Prefecture, on a clear day perhaps the most spectacular location of any ex-SDF aircraft.

(Photo [May 2019]: 樹空の森 via facility’s Twitter account @Jukuunomori)

The aircraft are on open-air display unless otherwise stated. Bold-type serial numbers indicate aircraft that appear in photos immediately after the relevant table; months in parentheses the dates non-museum aircraft were last confirmed as still present.

Carried out way back in 2014 to mark the Self-Defense Forces’ 60th anniversary, a census of JGSDF types produced mixed results. Utilizing information gained from the census, two special reports on displayed aircraft were added in a separate section at the very end of the tabular information; a third was added as the result of a visit to Kisarazu in September 2017:

KV-107II at Crossland Oyabe amusement park, Toyama Prefecture
UH-1H at Herb World Akita, Yurihonjo, Akita Prefecture (note that this aircraft was removed in 2019)
KV-107II-4A at Kisarazu Army Camp Museum, Chiba Prefecture

Since the last major update of this page, the remaining dozen or so Hughes TH-55Js have suffered a major cull. Belatedly it was discovered that white asbestos had been used in the manufacture of the engine mount and fuel line cushioning materials. As of this writing (January 2021), only half of the original number, if that, remain.

At the other end of the service timescale, the UH-1J is among those aircraft types that have yet to appear on display or serve base ground instruction or publicity purposes. As some of the first examples, which date back to 1989, have likely already been withdrawn from service if not scrapped, the type will become more prominent in second-line use as deliveries of its successor UH-2 get under way.

As a general guide, a colour-coded Where Are They Now? listing by prefecture follows the tabular JMSDF aircraft information [here].

utsut-34In a more common or garden location, this weather-beaten JGSDF Beech T-34A Mentor wiles
away its days in a meadow close to the main gate of the service’s Kita-Utsunomiya airfield.

For the purposes of disseminating and promoting its policies as well as for recruitment publicity, the Japan Ministry of Defense provides retired aircraft on free loan to local public entities, certain categories of school, other relevant persons and those who will conduct promotion activities. The loan agreements are renewable on no more than an annual basis. The lessee will be responsible for the costs of transportation, management and upkeep required for the loaned aircraft. Over the years, JGSDF helicopters have been a particularly popular choice.

The lessee will usually follow a four-stage procedure. Firstly, an application will be made to an SDF Regional Cooperation Headquarters, which will act as coordinator between the service’s upper echelons and the unit that will physically provide the loaned aircraft. There then follow the loan application and approval procedures, which if successful will lead to the aircraft being installed on site by SDF personnel.

A scene from the event held at JGSDF Kasumigaura on March 26, 2020, to mark the coming home
to roost of the last flights made by JGSDF OH-6Ds. After the photo calls, the 15 aircraft were   
pushed one by one into a hangar
(link) and an uncertain future.
(Photo: Lien via Twitter @roomskyguard)

Fixed-Wing Types

Beech T-34A Mentor

Serial Last Known Location
(60501)  Formerly at Higashi-Chitose Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture
 (Photo from April 2016 [link], had been removed by April 2017)
60505

 JGSDF Obihiro Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture (moved from Bihoro Air Park,
 Bihoro, Abashiri District, Hokkaido Prefecture, in Dec. 2016)

60506  Kita-Utsunomiya Army Camp, Tochigi Prefecture
 (Pictured above in May 2013, photo from June 2019 [link])
60508  On indoor display at Tokorozawa Aviation Museum, Saitama Prefecture
 (Photos on dedicated museum page [link] and from Dec. 2020 [link])
60509  On roof of PR Exhibit Room at Yao Army Camp, Osaka Prefecture
 (Photo from Oct. 2015 [link])
 Last updated: Dec. 30, 2020

tokorozawat-34Several of the aircraft on display at the Tokorozawa Aviation Museum, including this
1950s-vintage T-34A Mentor, are suspended from the ceiling.

T-34 Yao roofFor many years, the PR Exhibit Room at Yao Army Camp has had this T-34A perched on its roof.
(Photo [October 2012]: Hunini via Wikimedia Commons)

Cessna L-19E* Bird Dog

Serial Last Known Location
11204  Reportedly in storage at Kawaguchiko Motor Museum, Yamanashi Prefecture       
11209

 Instructional airframe at Japan Aviation Academy Wajima (JAAW) Noto Airport
 Campus, 9-27-7 Sue, Mitsui, Wajima, Ishikawa Prefecture
 (Photo from Oct. 2016 [link], noted with main wings removed likely awaiting
 disposal at JAAW event Oct. 2018)

11210

 As 11209 (Photo from Oct. 2016 [link], noted with main wings removed likely
 awaiting disposal at JAAW event Oct. 2018)

11214

 Old Car Center KUDAN, Naraha, Futaba District, Fukushima Prefecture
 (Photo from Sept. 2019 [link])

11364  (L-19E-2) Tachikawa Army Camp, Tokyo (photo from Sept. 2018 [link])
11366  (L-19E-2) Main gate of Kita-Utsunomiya Army Camp, Tochigi Prefecture
 (Photo immediately below, and from June 2019 [link])

 * L-19E-1 unless otherwise stated. All survivors in Japan are from 22 built under licence by Fuji.

 Last updated: Jan. 15, 2021

jgsdfl-19Photographed in May 2013, this L-19E-2 still forms part of  the huddle of aircraft parked at
Kita-Utsunomiya Army Camp’s main gate.

Tachikawa L-19 (photo)

Whether by accident or design, the L-19E-2 pictured in the photo (above) in the “engine room”
at the Tachikawa Army Camp museum in November 2017 was the same aircraft as that
parked outside. This particular aircraft was delivered to the JGSDF in March 1960,
withdrawn from use with the 1st Sqn in December 1986, and previously
displayed at Takigahara Army Camp, Shizuoka Prefecture.

tachikawal-19

jaawl-19Japan Aviation Academy Wajima (JAAW) keeps two L-19Es in the hangar at its
campus at Noto Airport, Ishikawa Prefecture.
(Taken in January 2014, photo courtesy Masayuki Sakamoto, JAAW)

Reliving their service days, the two JAAW L-19s sit tethered out on the airfield in October 2015.
What became of them?
(Photo: i北陸 [i-Hokuriku] / Hokuriku region
official event and tourist destination blog [link])

Where They Went (1) / United States

It is estimated that, within the space of a year from March 1954, 104 Cessna L-19As were passed on initially to the National Security Force (NSF) and then the nascent JGSDF. Although known as the O-1A Bird Dog to the U.S. Army from September 18, 1962, the JGSDF continued to use the old-style designation.

As shown in the table below, a handful of former JGSDF L-19As were ultimately returned to the country of their birth, where they passed into private ownership. Strangely, two were to be involved in separate, fortunately non-fatal accidents while engaged in the towing of advertising banners in Florida in 2014.

Known Former JGSDF L-19As on U.S. Civil Register

JGSDF c/n ex-U.S. Army U.S. Reg’n Notes
11051 21198 50-1524 N5022K  
11063 22031 51-11987 N212KY Lost power and crashed due fuel starvation
when towing banner, off Miami Beach,  Florida, Sept. 6, 2014
(See photo below)
11067 22956 51-12501 N211PP Banner towing accident, Tampa Bay, off 
St. Petersburg, Florida, Mar. 23, 2014
11096 21290 50-1597 N305AB At Oshkosh July 2015
11101 21714 51-4829 N5073Y (See photo below)
 
L-19A CessnaPossibly taken prior to delivery at the Cessna factory in Wichita, Kansas, this undated photo shows
the aircraft that went on to serve with the JGSDF as 11101. First registered in the United States in 
May 1986, N5073Y was still current in September 2015, when seen in Keokuk, Iowa
[link].

(Photo from March 1952 issue of The World’s Aircraft used with permission of Hobun Shorin Co., Ltd.)
 
O-1A N2121KYAt the other end of the timeline, this photo shows pristine L-19A (O-1A) N212KY (formerly U.S.
Army 51-11987 and JGSDF 11063) at North Perry Airport, Florida, in March 2013.
Sadly, this aircraft was to come to grief in a non-fatal accident off Miami Beach, Florida,
in September the following year, when being operated by a banner towing company.
(Photo: André Dupont via Wikimedia Commons)
 

Where They Went (2) / Royal Thai Army 

Thailand is another country where former JGSDF L-19As are to be found, albeit mostly in varying degrees of dilapidation following service with the Royal Thai Army. The survivors include the first of the type to be operated by the NSF, which is now on display as ‘25190’ in U.S. Army markings at the Jesada Technik Museum in Nakhon Chaisi [link]. Confusingly, another this time grey-painted former JGSDF aircraft bears the same serial [link].

An article in the February 2018 issue of Kōkū Fan provides a listing of the total of 14 airframes that have been in store since late 2010 at the Jesada Technical Museum. Some of the article’s photos are of a huddle of derelict L-19As still bearing crudely painted numbers, as noted back in 2012, which could indicate that they had at one stage been awaiting sale at auction for scrap.

Another intact example is on display at the Royal Thai Army’s Phetchabun Base in Amphor Lomsak [link].

The Foundation for the Preservation and Development of Thai Aircraft (unofficially but more commonly referred to as the Tango Collection) has 10 former JGSDF airframes stored at its Saraburi Aero Park facility and another at Don Muang in Bangkok.

Known Former JGSDF L-19As in Thailand

JGSDF RThaiArmy Current location (if known)
11001 1349 Displayed at Jesada Technik Museum, Nakhon Chaisi, as green (not silver) ‘U.S. Army 25190’ (Photo link in text)
11005 4672 Stored, Tango Collection Saraburi Aero Park
11008 1418 Possibly stored at Jesada Technik Museum
11009 1500  
11011 1372  
11014 4717 Stored, Tango Collection Saraburi Aero Park
11016 4834 Stored, Tango Collection Saraburi Aero Park
11019 1716  
11024 1574 Stored, Tango Collection Saraburi Aero Park
11025 4742 Stored at Jesada Technik Museum
  (Photo taken Mar. 2012 [link])
11027 1565  
11028 1590 Stored, Tango Collection Saraburi Aero Park
11029 4647 Stored at Jesada Technik Museum
11031 1358  
11033 1659  
11036 1620 Stored, Tango Collection, Don Muang, Bangkok
11038 1603 Stored, Tango Collection Saraburi Aero Park
11046 1490 Stored, Tango Collection Saraburi Aero Park
11048 1607 Stored at Jesada Technik Museum
11049 1634 Stored, Tango Collection Saraburi Aero Park
11053 1562 Stored, Tango Collection Saraburi Aero Park
11056 1510  
11064 2481 Stored at Jesada Technik Museum
11065 1706  
11066 4887 Displayed at Royal Thai Army Phetchabun Base,
Amphor Lomsak
11068 2130  
11070 2118 Stored at Jesada Technik Museum as grey not green ‘25190’
(Photo link in text)
11074 2577 Stored at Jesada Technik Museum
11079 2353  
11080 1554 Stored, Tango Collection Saraburi Aero Park
11084 2498 Stored at Jesada Technik Museum
11085 1400 Stored at Jesada Technik Museum
11088 4854 Stored at Jesada Technik Museum
11091 1601  
11092 4699 Stored at Jesada Technik Museum
11093 2003 Stored at Jesada Technik Museum
11100 4792 Stored at Jesada Technik Museum

(Source: Kōkū Fan, February 2018)

A Japanese blog includes photos taken during a visit to the Jesada Technik Museum, which also houses a large car collection, in December 2017 [link].

Thai aviation guru Steve Darke maintains his website here [link], which contains a link to copious photos of L-19s/O-1s [link], including those in states of disrepair. Steve also updates an aircraft location listing here [link]. 

Fuji LM Variants*

Former Serial Notes
21001 (c/n LM1-3) ff (then as JGSDF `2011′) Sept. 8, 1956, delivered Oct. 2, 1956
Listed as returned to U.S. after wfu June 13, 1977, although photographed after
retirement on display at Akeno Army Camp in Mar. 1988 (link)  
→ N6335W Registration cancelled Feb. 2018 
21002

(LM1-4) Returned to U.S. after wfu Mar. 31, 1978
Up for sale on aircraft.com (link), no other information

21007

(LM1-9) Photo at Iruma AB Oct. 1973 (link)
Returned to U.S. after wfu June 8, 1976 → N608FU, photo from Sept. 2017 (link)
Still flying July 2018 (see Bulletin Board Jan. 21, 2021)

Ownership registered in Oklahoma since June 2017, same owner also registered
LM-2 N2105N in Oct. 2019

21008

(LM1-11) Returned to U.S. after wfu Dec. 16, 1981
→ N2108A Valiant Air Command (tail code VAC 1008) late 80s/early 90s
(Photos from Oshkosh 1987 [link]) and from Aug. 1990 [link])
Still on register, owner in Louisiana

21010

(LM1-13) Photo at Yao May 1979 (link
Returned to U.S. after wfu Dec. 16, 1981
→ N2109L Valiant Air Command (as VAC 1010, photo from Mar. 1986 [link])**

21011

(LM1-14) Returned to U.S. after wfu Mar. 31, 1978
→ N8020K
(Photos in flight from Apr. 2017 [link], of cockpit in Sept. 2016 [link], and see those below)

Still on register (owner in Lynchburg, VA, Dec. 2016)

21012

(LM1-15) Photo at JGSDF Iwanuma Branch School 1966 (link)
Returned to U.S. after wfu Mar. 31, 1978
→ N62627 Registered in California 1996, still on register

21014

(LM1-17) Returned to U.S. after wfu June 12, 1980
→ N2104X
Involved in accident at Orlando, Florida Jan. 1, 1985

21017

(LM1-20) Returned to U.S. after wfu June 12, 1980
→ NX2109Z → N2109Z Valiant Air Command (as VAC 1017) late 80s/early 90s (photo from Feb. 1991 [link]), s
till flying May 2020 (link)

Owned by company in Brighton, CO

21019

(LM1-22) Photo at Akeno Oct. 1978 (link), returned to U.S. after wfu June 12, 1980
→ N21204 Valiant Air Command (as VAC 1019) late 80s/early 90s, present at VAC Warbird Museum, Titusville, Florida Apr. 2008 [link]),
registration cancelled Dec. 2014

21020

(LM1-23) Photo at Akeno Oct. 1979 (link), returned to U.S. after wfu Dec. 16, 1981
→ NX2121J → N2121J (Photos from Apr. 1991 [link] and Mar. 2001 [(link])
Written off in crash at Athens Ben Epps Airport, Georgia Oct. 22, 2009

21022

(LM1-25) Photo at Takayubaru Apr. 1978 (link), returned to U.S. after wfu June 12, 1980 → N2105X 1989 (link)
→ N122TF
 Valiant Air Command (as VAC 1022), Commemorative Air Force (TF 1022, photo from May 2004 [link])

Currently registered to owner in Pennsylvania

21051

(LM-2, ex LM-1 21016, c/n LM1-19)
Returned to U.S. after wfu Mar. 18, 1983 → N2105N (tail code LM 1051)

(Series of photos, including cockpit [link])
Registration passed to owner of LM1-9/N608FU in Oct. 2019

21052

(LM-2, ex LM-1 21026, c/n LM1-28)
Returned to U.S. after wfu June 12, 1980 → N2098V No information

21053

(LM-2, ex LM-1 21024, c/n LM1-10)
Returned to U.S. after wfu June 12, 1980 → N2100J** 

 (*) All LM-1 with exception of last three, which were those LM-1s converted to LM-2 standard.
      (Green construction numbers denote those aircraft believed still current)

(**) One of the two aircraft involved in fatal collision, June 29, 1991  

 Last updated: Jan. 25, 2021

The JGSDF had the misfortune to suffer the loss of four LM-1s, three of which were during the course of normal operations: 21018, which was wrecked at Takamubaru airfield (today Takayubaru Army Camp), Kumamoto Prefecture on December 10, 1959; 21023, which crashed in the mountains above the then town of Uchinomi on Shodo Is., Kagawa Prefecture, when flying across the Inland Sea en route from Takayubaru (Kumamoto) to Yao (Osaka) on August 1, 1968, claiming the lives of all three on board; and 21009 the following week, on August 7, 1968, in the Mt. Yoshino area of Nara Prefecture, while searching for 21023.

自衛隊機乗り逃げ事件
Mystery Disappearance – JGSDF “Stolen Ride Incident”, June 1973

To this day, the other LM-1 loss remains shrouded in a true “Where is it now?” mystery. The story goes that an aircraft was taken without permission, in effect stolen, the perpetrator being a then 20-year-old JGSDF ground crewman who was undergoing training to be a pilot at the Utsunomiya School.

Under cover of darkness at around 21:00 on June 23, 1973, a Sgt. Yukio Kayano managed to singlehandedly take the aircraft (21005, seen here at Matsushima in July 1964 [link]) from a hangar at the airfield, which at that time of night was, at least in theory, closed for operations.

As reported in the September 1973 edition of Aireview magazine, the aircraft had been parked at the front of the No. 2 Hangar, which at the time had contained 10 L-19s and seven other LM-1s. An incriminating sergeant’s cap had been found in the hangar.

According to media reports marking the 45th anniversary of the incident in 2018, Sgt. Kayano had previously been seen drinking in a mess bar. No other evidence about what night have prompted his actions or about his mental state have ever come to light.

Not surprisingly, the unauthorized flight did not go entirely undetected as at least one eyewitness had seen the aircraft heading south, but by staying at low altitude Sgt. Kayano managed to evade detection by all three JASDF radar sites in the area. (This was three years prior to the somewhat higher profile incident involving a defecting Soviet pilot, who landed a MiG-25 at Hakodate Airport, Hokkaido Prefecture.) All subsequent attempts to establish radio contact went unanswered, either intentionally or because the tyro pilot had yet to receive tuition on how to operate the aircraft’s communications equipment.

Assuming that the aircraft was parked with full tanks, its range would have been around 1,300 km, enough to remain airborne for just over five hours. As a mechanic, Sgt. Kayano had accumulated all of 2hrs 10mins on the LM-1 and 6hrs 45mins on helicopters when accompanying bona fide crews on post-maintenance checks. Although he was due to sit the pilot’s exam, the exact stage of training that he had reached is not known.

A month-long search was initiated by the SDF and police, with the coast guard also called in on the basis of around 70 reports from residents who had heard an aircraft that night. These seemed to indicate that the aircraft had headed for the Mito/Katsuta area in neighbouring Ibaraki Prefecture and then out over the Pacific Ocean. This incident took place during Japan’s rainy season, so the weather might have been a factor, but no trace was ever found.

In the end, Sgt. Kayano was officially discharged from the service in absentia on disciplinary grounds (whereabouts unknown) on August 1 that same year, and seven JGSDF personnel reprimanded for failing in their responsibilities with regard to the aircraft’s management and safekeeping.

Although J-HangarSpace has been unable to find any date and location information, apparently an SDF hangar fire had previously resulted in the loss of at least one aircraft and other assets. A subsequent investigation had found that the hangar doors had been locked and so, in hoping to learn from that lesson, doors were thereafter only to be bolted from the outside in case there was an emergency. They had reckoned without the thought processes of an inebriated young pilot’s desire to take an ill-advised and ultimately ill-fated flight.

Triumphs and Tragedies during U.S. Ownership History

From the above data table, it seems that at least 15 of the 23 LMs that remained were eventually passed to U.S. ownership, where they became popular participants at air displays and fly-ins.

Although hardly a “warbird”, the type was one of those adopted by, among others, the Valiant Air Command (VAC) warbird group, an educational organization that dates back to 1977.

Quite early in the U.S. chapter of the type’s history, on January 1, 1985, two LM-1s were performing a formation display at Odessa Airport, Florida. One of them, N2104X, was fully laden with a pilot and three passengers, all of whom were potential VAC members. According to the accident report, its pilot displayed poor judgement when attempting to execute a low-altitude loop, which resulted in the aircraft impacting the ground mid-manoeuvre and skidding across an apron on its belly into some parked aircraft before coming to rest. Although two of the occupants were taken to hospital in serious condition, the other two luckily sustained only minor injuries.

A world away from its future and all-too brief second career in the United States, this shows N2104X 
as newish JGSDF recruit 21014 at Oita Airport in 1957, when assigned to the 4th Aviation Corps at
Metabaru, Saga Prefecture. Another image
(link) shows the same aircraft looking spick and
span at Akeno in October 1979.
(Photo: Takao Kadokami)

On June 29, 1991, the LM pilot community suffered the tragic loss of two of its members. They were flying the third (LM-1 N2109L) and fourth (LM-2 N2100J) aircraft in a four-aircraft formation when their wings touched during a performance at Keystone Heights Airport in Florida.

One other incident occurred at Athens Ben Epps Airport in Georgia on October 22, 2009. The aircraft (N2121J) had only been flown for 30 hours in the two years prior to the accident, because the owner had surrendered his FAA medical certificate and moved to another state. A pilot-rated acquaintance was accompanying him in bringing the aircraft across. On takeoff, the aircraft was seen to stall for reasons that could not be determined with any accuracy by the subsequent investigation into the accident, which claimed the lives of both men.

By 2016, no less than 11 LMs were in the possession of Headquarters Squadron War Planes (HSWP) at two locations in Connecticut. In various states of disrepair, they had been amassed over the years by a collector named Peter Palo and, following his death at the age of 95 in 2012, were being put up for sale by his nephew.

The majority of these aircraft, which included N6335W, were in Putnam, Connecticut, the only exception was N122TF, which was located in the town of Andover. A Japanese resident sent a report to the hikokikumo.net site that stated that N122TF, which had 6,320 flying hours on its airframe, was in a disassembled state and that its engine had only 606 hours. Its special low price was $15,000, less than what a low-hour engine alone would cost. As they had been cannibalized for parts common with the T-34 Mentor and were being stored in the open air, the asking prices for the other aircraft were: fuselage only, $2,000; a fuselage with engine, $3,000; and fuselage, wings and engine for $5,000. The prices obviously took into account the desire for a quick sale and the expenses associated with assembly and, were that the intention, registration paperwork. A “restored” example was on offer for $35,000.

The above-mentioned LM-1 N122TF well turned out at a Confederate Air Force event at
Midland, Texas, in October 2012.
(Photo: Andy Binks) 

Sadly, the costs involved have worked against any repatriations to Japan, where the Tokorozawa Aviation Museum would have been an ideal beneficiary.

Another ill-fated LM-1 in its previous JGSDF guise at Oita Airport, 21024, the later N2121J
(Photo [Nov. 1960]: Takao Kadokami)

Camera-eager N8020K

One of those imported and sold by HSWP, this LM-1 in particular has over the years been a regular visitor to airshows and filler of the viewfinders of visiting photographers. These days, the aircraft even has its very own Facebook page (link).

LM-1Bearing crudely written Japanese titling, N8020K is seen here at Lakeland Linder International
Airport, Florida, in April 2009. Still airworthy, the aircraft is currently registered to an
owner in Virginia.
(Photo: RuthAS via Wikimedia Commons) 

Taxying, and taking off (link) during Oshkosh 2016.
(Photo [uploaded Jan. 2016]: Skies of Glory via Twitter @violetpilot1)

At the show marking the 75th anniversary of Naval Air Station Oceana, Virginia, in September 2018.
(Photo: Monica E. Del Coro/Tomas Del Coro via Wikimedia Commons)

N8020K again at Lakeland Linder International Airport, Florida
(Photo [uploaded Oct. 2020]: Abel Villalobos via Twitter @altimox)

LMs on YouTube

N2105N (Video posted Oct. 2015 [link])
View from inside the cockpit on a flight along a coastline. The Japanese beneath the compass (left) warns that the landing gear and flaps must not be lowered at airspeeds in excess of 109 knots.

N2109Z (Video posted in Dec. 2020 [link])
A prospective buyer provides a great look around and inside N2109Z inside a hangar at Centennial Airport in Denver, Colorado. Note that this LM, like in certain other cases, erroneously sports a JASDF rather than a JGSDF badge on its nose. This aircraft has also had its standard two-bladed prop replaced by a three-bladed version, as was fitted to the LM-2. A series of photos of this aircraft, including one of the instrument panel, can be found here (link).

N8020K, as featured above (Video posted in Aug. 2017 [link])
Shows the aircraft taking off from New London Airport, Virginia

This photo provides a comparison with the instrument panel photos seen in the videos and in the
photos of N2109Z. Here, the landing gear and flap warning appears in English beneath the coaming.

(Photo [undated, location unknown]: San Diego Air & Space Museum via Wikimedia Commons)

Kawasaki KAL-2

Serial Location
20001

 On indoor display at Tokorozawa Aviation Museum, Saitama Prefecture
 (Current, photos on dedicated museum page [link])

 Last updated: Nov. 19, 2019

kal-2Originally delivered to the nascent JASDF for testing in December 1954, this is one of
only two KAL-2s ever built. Its sister was scrapped after serving with the JMSDF.

Mitsubishi LR-1

Serial Last Known Location
22001  Used for instructional purposes at JGSDF Kasumigaura Aviation School,
 Ibaraki Prefecture
22003  Tachikawa Army Camp, Tokyo (Current, photo from Sept. 2018 [link])
22004

 Mitsu Seiki Co., Ltd., 301 Shimogawai, Awaji, Hyogo Prefecture 656-1522
 (See Feb. 18, 2014, report on Aviation Museums page)

 (Current, photo from Aug. 2016 [link])

22006  Main gate at Kita-Utsunomiya Army Camp, Tochigi Prefecture
 (Current, photo from June 2019 [link])
22007  Instructional airframe at Narita Aeronautics College, 1842 Toride-Nishino,
 Toride City, Ibaraki Prefecture 302-0004 (April 2017)
22008  Kasuminome Army Camp, Miyagi Prefecture
 (Current, photo of aircraft [link] and instrument panel [link] from July 2016)
22009

 Misawa Aviation & Science Museum, Misawa, Aomori Prefecture

 (Current, photo from Oct. 2020 [link])

22010  Shizuoka Institute of Science and Technology, Fukuroi, Shizuoka Prefecture 
 (Current, photos from Mar. 2013 [link] and, at Hamamatsu AB, Sept. 2020 [link])
22013  Kita-Kumamoto Army Camp, Kumamoto Prefecture
 (Current, photo from Apr. 2019 [link])
22014  Jinmachi Army Camp, Higashine, Yamagata Prefecture
22016  (Painted as formerly based 22019) Naha Army Camp, Okinawa Prefecture
 (current June 2020, see below)
22019  Possibly still at Kisarazu Army Camp, Chiba Prefecture (see 22016)
22020  Kisarazu Army Camp Museum, Chiba Prefecture (current, photo from
 Dec. 2019 [link])
 Last updated: May 13, 2021

utsulr-1A high proportion of LR-1 aircraftthe JGSDF’s liaison/reconnaissance version of the Mitsubishi
MU-2 business turboprop—were placed at the gates of army camps upon retirement.
This is 22006, on the main gate at Kita-Utsunomiya Army Camp in May 2013.

tachikawalr-1Delivered in March 1972, the third LR-1 built served with the Eastern Region Headquarters Flight
at Tachikawa, where the aircraft has thus far spent its retirement.

LR-1 22007  YaoDelivered to the JGSDF in 1976, the LR-1 now at the Narita Aeronautics College in Toride City,
Ibaraki Prefecture, was a long-term resident at Yao, Osaka Prefecture, with the Central
Region HQ Flight. Initially painted black overall
(as seen in the above photo), the
aircraft sported World War II-like green and brown camouflage in the 90s.
Today, 22007 still bears the low-viz scheme, tail marking and nose ‘M’
(for ‘middle’) from its last days at the Central Region.
(Above photo [Yao, March 1980]: Takao Kadokami)

LR-1 22007 Toride(Photo [Narita Aeronautics College, April 2017]: Warren Hardcastle)

LR-1 22009 had served with the Western Army following its delivery in March 1978 but was with the
Eastern Army at the time of its retirement in 2006. The aircraft was added to the Sky Plaza exhibits
at the Misawa Aviation & Science Museum in November that year.

(Photo [Dec. 2019]: Warren Hardcastle)

The Jinmachi LR-1 in its fenced-off paddock in April 2014 (Photo: contri via Wikimedia Commons)
The aircraft can be seen looking a bit down in the dumps in photos from this April 2019
report
(link), which offers comparisons with its condition in September 2012.

(Photo [June 2020]: JGSDF 15th Brigade via Twitter @jgsdf_15b_pr)

Taken during maintenance carried out over the first three days of June 2020, the above photo of the LR-1 (actually 22016) at Naha Army Camp shows that, despite being open to the elements, the aircraft is being kept in good condition. The aircraft benefits from being part of a memorial to the LR-1 crew who lost their lives on active service when flying 22012 during an air ambulance mission in February 1990. The real 22019, which was the first assigned to the then 101st AvSqn and still present when operations of the type from Naha ceased in May 2010, ended its days at Kisarazu (see below).

lr-1ontowA scene from the past: LR-1 22019 is prepared for towing at Kisarazu, October 2012. The last
examples having entered service in 1984, the type was gradually replaced by the LR-2 and
the one remaining withdrawn from service after its final flight, on February 15, 2016.
After 18 years based at Naha, Okinawa Prefecture, 220019 had initially been
moved to Kisarazu-based 1st Helicopter Brigade on October 29, 2010, and
been the last LR-1 to appear at a Kita-Utsunomiya open day in May 2012.
The aircraft amassed a total of 7,490 flight hours in its service career.
In honour of its sterling service in Okinawa, 220016 was repainted as
its sister aircraft and placed on display at Naha
(as related above).

The 20th and last LR-1 built on display at the Kisarazu Army Camp open day in September 2017.
The 1st Helicopter Brigade uploaded to its Facebook account a video of time-lapse footage,
dated December 4, 2018, showing the aircraft being moved to its now permanent
home in front of the base museum
(link).

Piper L-21B Super Cub

Serial Location
12032

 On indoor display at Tokorozawa Aviation Museum, Saitama Prefecture
 (Current, photos on dedicated museum page [link])

12045

 Kawaguchiko Motor Museum, Fujizakura Highland, Narusawa,
 Minamitsuru District, Yamanashi Prefecture 401-0320
 (See Aug. 29, 2014, report on Aviation Museums page)

 Last updated: Nov. 19, 2019

tokorozawal-21The Piper L-21B at Tokorozawa was originally donated to the National Security Force
(NSF)
—the JGSDF’s immediate forerunner—in 1953. To the left can be seen the
Planes of Fame Mitsubishi Zero that was resident at Tokorozawa for a time in 2013.

Stinson L-5E Sentinel

Serial Location
”535025″  (Original serial possibly 10303) On indoor display at Tokorozawa Aviation
 Museum, Saitama Prefecture (current, photos on dedicated museum page [link])
 Last updated: Nov. 19, 2019

tokorozawal-5A total of around 40 Stinson L-5 Sentinel aircraft are believed to have served in Japan.
The example at Tokorozawa was delivered in 1952 for the
National Police Reserve
(NPR) but saw service with the NSF.

Helicopters

The spacious area outside the public relations building at Hachinohe Army Camp has been the
long-term home of three retired helicopters: UH-1H 41662; TH-55J 61336; and OH-6D 31178.
(Photo [early 2019]: JGSDF Northeastern Army)

Likewise this OH-6J/UH-1H duo forms part of the collection at Ainoura Army Camp in
Sasebo, Nagasaki Prefecture.
(Photo [undated]: うみみち via Twitter @shimabarakko)

Two inmates at The Old Car Center in Naraha, Fukushima Prefecture. Although bearing the
serial number 30216, the H-13KH
(left) was originally delivered to the JGSDF as 30217 in
late September 1966, withdrawn from use almost 13 years to the day later, and displayed at
Kasumigaura in the early 1980s. Although still present in September 2020, the TH-55J
likely fell victim to the “asbestos blight” that ravaged the surviving examples of this
type during the course of that year.
(Photo [Dec. 2019]: Warren Hardcastle)

ih-1 on trailer
Withdrawn JGSDF helicopters often serve out their time as maintenance training airframes.
Used for that purpose by Eastern Army Aviation, Fuji-Bell UH-1H 41714
(above) and
former 11th AvSqn Kawasaki-Hughes OH-6D
31173 (below) were paraded on
specialized trucks at Tachikawa Army Camp in November 2013. The yellow
stickers on both aircraft proclaimed the 40th anniversary of the return of
the first part of the base from U.S. to Japanese control on June 30, 1973.

oh-6d on trailer

oh-6d trailer closeup

oh-6d on truck (left side)

Although withdrawn from active service, late-model UH-1H 41714 was for a number of years adorned with colour schemes to coincide with Tachikawa’s autumn open days.

Tachikawa Eastern Army Avaition Group 50th Anniversary Nov. 2012
Left side (link); right side (link); nose (link)
The abbreviation EAAFM on the fuselage door stood for Eastern Army Aircraft Field Maintenance.

Tachikawa 40th Anniversary Nov. 2013 (as above)
Right side, on trailer (link); tail boom “Since 1973” (link

Tachikawa 43rd Disaster Prevention Aviation Festival Oct. 2016
Special marking 43the [sic] Disaster prevention aviation festival
Right side (link); right side fuselage (link)
Left side (link); left side tail boom (link); nose (link)

Tachikawa 44th Disaster Prevention Aviation Festival Oct. 2017
Right side (link)

Eurocopter (Aérospatiale) AS332L Super Puma

Serial Last Known Location
00001  In store at Kasumigaura Army Camp, Ibaraki Prefecture, since 2006,
 sold to New Zealand early 2018 (see photo below) 
00002  Possibly still in store, Kasumigaura Army Camp, Ibaraki Prefecture
00003

 (As 00001)

 Last updated: Sept. 2, 2018

 Oceania AS332LOne of the two former JGSDF AS322Ls acquired by Oceania Aviation of New Zealand is
unloaded from a trailer at the company’s hangar at Ardmore, near Auckland, in April
2018. Having been in storage for 11 years, they eventually found a new owner
following a bidding process commenced in December 2017. A YouTube
video shows time-lapse footage of their arrival
(link).
(Photo: Oceania Aviation Limited)

Fuji-Bell AH-1S Cobra

Serial Last Known Location
73401  On indoor display at JGSDF Public Information Center, 4-6 Sakaecho,
 Asaka, Saitama Prefecture (current)
73402  Instructional airframe at JGSDF Kasumigaura Aviation School,
 Ibaraki Prefecture
 Last updated: Jan. 10, 2021

Asaka AH-1SThe first JGSDF AH-1S Cobra is given pride of place on the ground floor of the service’s
Public Information Center at Asaka, Saitama Prefecture, which passed the
1.5 million visitor mark on Nov. 9, 2014.

Fuji-Bell UH-1B (Part 1/2)

Serial Last Known Location
41506  Above entrance to TENPOS kitchen equipment recycle centre in Chokushicho,
 Takamatsu, Kagawa Prefecture (current, photo from July 2018 [link])
41507  Nayoro Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture (believed still present)
41508  Nihonbara Army Camp, Okayama Prefecture (Oct. 2017)
41514  Utsunomiya Army Camp, Tochigi Prefecture (current, photo from June 2019 [link])
41524  Converted into flight simulator and displayed at Tochigi Science Museum,
 567 Nishikawada-machi, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-0151 (current)
41528  Yonago Army Camp, Tottori Prefecture (June 2014)
41531   (As “41581”) Old Car Center KUDAN, Naraha, Futaba District, Fukushima
 Prefecture (Current, photos from Aug. 2009 [link] and Dec. 2020 [link])
41543  Instructional airframe at Bihoro Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture (Apr. 2020)

 (Photos of all Bihoro aircraft up to July 2018 [link])

41547

 In indoor exhibition area, Tokorozawa Aviation Museum, Saitama Prefecture

 (Current, photos on dedicated museum page [link] and from Dec. 2020 [link])

41557

 Toyokawa Army Camp, Aichi Prefecture (Current, photo from Apr. 2018 [link])

41558

 Engaru Army Camp, Mombetsu District, Hokkaido Prefecture (Apr. 2020)

41559  Instructional airframe at Shinodayama Army Camp, Izumi, Osaka Prefecture

 (Believed still present, photo from Apr. 2017 [link])

 Last updated: May 13, 2021 / Continued in Part 2 below

41514 Utsunomiya UH-1Delivered to the JGSDF on September 28, 1965, UH-1B 41514 was withdrawn from use on
September 24, 1985, four days short of its 20th anniversary. The aircraft is a long-term
display resident at Camp Utsunomiya, Tochigi Prefecture.
(Photo [April 2017]: Warren Hardcastle
)

UH-1B ShinodyamaShinodayama Army Camp at Izumo, Osaka Prefecture, still looks after this UH-1B. On active
servce from August 1970 to May 1988, 41559 has been on display here since at least the
late 1990s and appears to have been treated to a recent fresh coat of paint.

(Photo [April 2016]: Hunini via Wikimedia Commons)

Fuji-Bell UH-1B (Part 2/2)

Serial Last Known Location
41560  In storage hangar at Tokorozawa Aviation Museum, Saitama Prefecture
 (Current, photos on dedicated museum page [link] and from Oct. 2014 [link])

41571  Kita-Utsunomiya Army Camp, Tochigi Prefecture (current, photo from
 May 2018 [link])
41575  Akita Army Camp, Akita Prefecture (Believed still present Apr. 2020)
41576  Abandoned rotorless at Sendai Army Camp, Kagoshima Prefecture (Apr.2020)
“41581”  (See 41531) 
41583  JGSDF Obihiro Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture (moved from Bihoro Air Park,
 Bihoro, Abashiri District, Hokkaido Prefecture, in Dec. 2016)
41585  Shinto Furusato Park, 1920-1 Yamakoda, Shintomura, Kitagunma District,
 Gunma Prefecture 370-3502 (still present Feb. 2019)
 (Photos from Jan. 2010 [link] and on tourism website May 2017 [link])
41586  Fukushima Army Camp, Fukushima Prefecture (possibly removed 2019)
41589  Hakodate Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture (believed current, photo from
 Aug. 2015 [link])
41590  Kushiro Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture (current July 2018, photo from
 Aug. 2016 [link])
 Last updated: May 13, 2021

utsuuh-1bHeavily influenced by U.S. operations in Vietnam, the JGSDF operated a total of 90 UH-1B
helicopters. The type was given the unofficial name Hiyodori
(Bulbul).

UH-1B BihoroA long-standing resident at the Bihoro Air Park in Hokkaido Prefecture, as shown
here in August 2009, UH-1B 41583 was among those aircraft moved to
JGSDF Obihiro Army Camp in December 2016.
(Photo: ‘100 yen’ via Wikimedia Commons)  

Fuji-Bell UH-1H (Part 1/5)

Serial Last Known Location
41606  Front fuselage used for indoor training purposes (with 41644) at
 Narashino Army Camp, Narashino, Chiba Prefecture
41610  Nerima Army Camp, Tokyo (photo from Apr. 2018 [link])
41613  Maegawara Army Camp, Kurume, Fukuoka Prefecture
41619  Kushiro Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture (current July 2018, but in sorry state
 alongside UH-1B 41590 in photo from Aug. 2016 [link])
(41620)

 Herb World Akita, 490-5 Shinmichishita, Numata, Nishimemachi,
 Yurihonjo, Akita Prefecture 018-0604 (removed in 2019)
 (See Displayed Aircraft Special Report 2 that follows tabular information)

41621  Uchihara Health Park, Mito City Hall Uchihara Branch Office, Mito,
 Ibaraki Prefecture (next to fire station, illuminated at night)
 (Photo from July 2019 [link])
41623

 Training use at Kasugai Army Camp, Kasugai, Aichi Prefecture

41625

 Matsumoto Army Camp, Nagano Prefecture (Apr. 2019)

41626

 Training use (with 41627) at Katsuta Army Camp, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki Prefecture

41627

 Training use (with 41626) at Katsuta Army Camp, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki Prefecture

41628

 Ebino Army Camp, Ebino, Miyazaki Prefecture (current, photo from
 May 2017 [
link])

41631

 Training use at Okubo Army Camp, Uji, Kyoto Prefecture

41635

 Ainoura Army Camp, Sasebo, Nagasaki Prefecture (photo from Aug. 2019 [link])

41637

 Main gate at Kita-Utsunomiya Army Camp, Tochigi Prefecture

 (Current, photo from June 2019 [link])

41638  Training use at Kaita Army Camp, Kaita, Hiroshima Prefecture
41640  Instructional airframe at Narita Aeronautics College, 1842 Toride-Nishino,
 Toride City, Ibaraki Prefecture 302-0004 (possibly no longer present)
41643  Training use at Kawanishi Army Camp, Hyogo Prefecture
41644  Front fuselage (with doors from 41721) used for indoor training purposes
 at Narashino Army Camp, Narashino, Chiba Prefecture
41645  Training use at Mishuku Army Camp, Setagaya, Tokyo (photo from Aug. 2017 [link])
41646  Kita-Kumamoto Army Camp, Kumamoto Prefecture (photo from Apr. 2019 [link])
41648  (Cockpit doors from scrapped 41609) Ogawa Marine Center, 269-1 Noda,
 Omitama, Ibaraki Prefecture 311-3411 (photo from Aug. 2019 [link])
41649

 Fukuchiyama Army Camp, Fukuchiyama, Kyoto Prefecture 

 (Photo from Dec. 2017 [link] still present Nov. 2019)

 Last updated: Jan. 10, 2021 / Continued in Part 2 below

This 1977-vintage UH-1H (41648) had arrived at what was then the B&G (Blue Sea & Green Land)
Foundation Ogawa Marine Center by 2002. Remaining when the swimming pool facility passed 
to municipal management in 2006, the aircraft had its main rotors disassembled before being
moved to one side while the center underwent renovation in 2018. Although some took this  
to be an indication of its imminent demise, the aircraft was still present in February 2020.

(Photo [Dec. 2018]: foxfoto via Twitter @Fox_now)

Matsumoto Army Camp, April 2019 (Photo: コタツvia Twitter @shuka_iizo)

Northern Army troops adhere to social distancing rules as they practice manhandling an anonymous
retired UH-1H during a four-day field training exercise held at Okadama and a training ground
in late May 2020.
(Photo: JGSDF Northern Army via Twitter @NorthernArmy_pr)

Fuji-Bell UH-1H (Part 2/5)

Serial Last Known Location
41651  Japan Defense Ministry, Ichigaya, Tokyo (See Location Report 7)
41652

 Kokubu Army Camp, Kirishima, Kagoshima Prefecture (photo from Feb. 2019 [link])

41653  Horobetsu Army Camp, Noboribetsu, Hokkaido Prefecture (July 2019)
41654  Training use at Utsunomiya Army Camp, Tochigi Prefecture
41656  Kanazawa Army Camp, Kanazawa, Ishikawa Prefecture (current, photo from
 Apr. 2017 [link])
41657

 Beppu Army Camp, Oita Prefecture

41659

 Uji Army Camp, Uji, Kyoto Prefecture

 (Current, photos from Apr. 2017 [link] and Apr. 2019 [link])

41662  Hachinohe Army Camp, Aomori Prefecture (with 41718)
 (Photo from Jan. 2017 [link])
41663  Shinmachi Army Camp, Takasaki, Gunma Prefecture (photos from Apr. 2014
  [link] and Oct. 2018 [link]; 41698 also present for training purposes)
41665  Kawasaki Heavy Industries Nishi-Kobe Works, Kobe, Hyogo Prefecture
41666 

 Miya River Watarai Park, 1260 Ohnogi, Watarai, Watarai District,
 Mie Prefecture (photos from Nov. 2016 [link] and Sept. 2020 [link])

41669

 Mitsu Seiki Co., Ltd., 301 Shimogawai, Awaji, Hyogo Prefecture 656-1522
 (See May 18, 2014, report on Aviation Museums page)

 (Photo from Aug. 2016 [link])

 Last updated: May 13, 2021 / Continued in Part 3 below

The resident UH-1H (41656) among the cherry blossoms at Kanazawa Army Camp in April 2020.
Repainted in the darker three-tone temperate region camouflage scheme, the aircraft featured in
a December 2020 Twitter report by the Toyama SDF Provincial Cooperation Office following 
an air experience flight arranged at the base for lottery-winning members of the public.

(Photo: 枕元の天使 via Twitter @knight306sq)

Uji Army Camp remained home to UH-1H 41659 in April 2019.
(Photo: ナガレ☆ぼしvia Twitter @ryuseinoyoru)

Another UH-1H to be found in natural surroundings, this one (41666) inhabits the Miya River
Watarai Park in Mie Prefecture.
(Photo [Mar. 2018]: WANI via Twitter @wanikon428)

Fuji-Bell UH-1H (Part 3/5)

Serial Last Known Location
41672

 JGSDF Public Information Center, 4-6 Sakaecho, Asaka,
 Saitama Prefecture (current, photo from May 2018 [link])

41676  Training use at Yonago Army Camp, Tottori Prefecture (photos from
 Oct. 2017 [link] and Oct. 2019 [link])
41678  Training use at Kita-Kumamato Army Camp, Kumamoto Prefecture 
41679  Rotorless training airframe at Kasugai Army Camp, Kasugai, Aichi Prefecture
41681  Training use at Kita-Utsunomiya Aviation School, Tochigi Prefecture
 (Photos from May 2013 [link] and May 2018 [link])
41682  Instructional airframe at Shinodayama Army Camp, Izumi, Osaka Prefecture
 (Believed still present, photo of cockpit from Apr. 2017 [link]; 41696 also
 used for training)
41683  Zentsuji Army Camp, Zentsuji, Kagawa Prefecture
41684  Rotorless training airframe at Matsudo Army Camp, Chiba Prefecture
 (Photo from Oct. 2020 [link])
41685  Rotorless instructional airframe at Kita-Utsunomiya Aviation School,
 Tochigi Prefecture (photo from May 2019 [link])
41689  Rotorless training airframe at Itazuma Army Camp, Gotemba,
 Shizuoka Prefecture (Dec. 2020)
 Last updated: May 13, 2021 / Continued in Part 4 below

UH-1H AsakaSqueezed in next to a pair of self-propelled howitzers, this example of a UH-1H (41672) can be
seen at the JGSDF Public Information Center at Asaka, Saitama Prefecture.

Formerly operated by the Northern Army Helicopter Squadron from Okadama, Sapporo, 
41676 has been at Yonago Army Camp adjacent to JASDF Miho AB since at least 2003.

(Photo [Oct. 2014]: Andy Binks)

JGSDF UH-1H ShinodayamaShinodayama Army Camp’s resident UH-1H 41682
(Photo [April 2016]: Hunini via Wikimedia Commons)

Seen here on its spot at Zentsuji Army Camp, Kagawa Prefecture, in September 2010, UH-1J
41683 had replaced UH-1B 41522. Although in this October 2019 photo
[link] next to a sign 
that wrongly states that the aircraft is a UH-1J, what is presumably the same aircraft seems 
to have had a new coat of camouflage.
(Photo: 663highland via Wikimedia Commons)

UH-1H 41689 at its home at the Itazuma Army Camp barracks in Gotemba,
Shizuoka Prefecture.
(Photo [Nov. 2019]: Warren Hardcastle) 

Fuji-Bell UH-1H (Part 4/5)

Serial Last Known Location
41690

 Minus main rotor at Tokushima Army Camp. Tokushima Prefecture

41692  Hirosaki Army Camp, Hirosaki, Aomori Prefecture
41693  Rotorless instructional airframe at Kita-Utsunomiya Aviation School,
 Tochigi Prefecture (photo from May 2019 [link])
41694  Funaoka Army Camp, Shibata Town, Miyagi Prefecture
41695  Rotorless on raised structure for instructional purposes at
 Kita-Utsunomiya Aviation School, Tochigi Prefecture
 (Photos from May 2013 [link] June 2019 [link])
41696  Training use at Shinodayama Army Camp, Izumi, Osaka Prefecture
 (also 41682 present, on display)
41697  Training use at Aomori Army Camp, Aomori Prefecture (June 2015)
41698  Training use at Shinmachi Army Camp, Takasaki, Gunma Prefecture
 (41663 also present on display)
41699

 Training use at Takikawa Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture

41700

 Fujisan Juku no Mori Park, Inno, Gotemba, Shizuoka Prefecture

 (As seen in this page’s header photo, photo from Apr. 2018 [link])

41701  Training use at Otsu Army Camp, Shiga Prefecture (Nov. 2019)
41703  Kasuminome Army Camp, Miyagi Prefecture (Feb. 2014)
41704  Jinmachi Army Camp, Higashine, Yamagata Prefecture (Apr. 2014)
 (41710 also possibly present as training airframe) 
41708  Taiwa Army Camp, Kurokawa District, Miyagi Prefecture
 Last updated: May 17, 2021 / Continued in Part 5 below

Manufactured in August 1988 and accepted into service later that year, UH-1H 41700 came to the 
end of its service career when with the Tachikawa-based Eastern Region Army Aviation Group in 
2009. Displayed at Tachikawa for a time from that October, the aircraft was placed in
Fujisan Juku no Mori Park by October the following year, 2010.

(Photos: [Top, Nov. 2020] 小豆 (Adzuki) via Twitter @airi_foret;
[above, Aug. 2020] 樹空の森 via facility’s Twitter account @Jukuunomori)

(Photo [41701, Otsu Army Camp, Shiga Prefecture, Nov. 2019]: Mike Jefferies)

JGSDF 41704 UH-1HIncluding UH-1H 41704, the aircraft preserved at Jinmachi Army Camp are surrounded
by white picket fences.
(Photo [April 2014]: ‘contri’ via Wikimedia Commons

Fuji-Bell UH-1H (Part 5/5)

Serial Last Known Location
41710  Training use at Jinmachi Army Camp, Higashine, Yamagata Prefecture
 (41704 also possibly present on display)
41711  Training use at Kokura Army Camp, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka Prefecture
 (Photo from Sept. 2018 [link])
41712  Makomanai Army Camp, Sapporo, Hokkaido Prefecture
 (Photo from June 2018 [link])
41714  Instructional airframe at Tachikawa Army Camp, Tokyo
 (Photo from Nov. 2019 [link])
 (See photo above, at start of Helicopter section)
41715

 Kochi Army Camp, Konan, Kochi Prefecture (possibly removed,
 photo from
 Sept. 2017 [link])

41716

 In front of Hirosaki University of Health & Welfare, Hirosaki,
 Aomori Prefecture (photos from June 2020 [link])     

41717 

 Training use at Hisai Army Camp, Tsu, Mie Prefecture

 (Photo from Apr. 2016 [link])

41718

 Training use at Hachinohe Army Camp, Aomori Prefecture
 (41662 also present)

(41721)  Front fuselage only, used for indoor training purposes, Narashino Army Camp,
 Chiba Prefecture (photo from Apr. 2017 [link], but reportedly removed and
 doors fitted to 41644)
41723  Omiya Army Camp, Omiya, Saitama Prefecture (photo from May 2017 [link])
41724  Display aircraft at Omura Army Camp, Nagasaki Prefecture
 (Photo from Nov. 2019 [link])
41726

 Training use at Rumoi Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture

 (Photo from Feb. 2018 [link])

41727  (Last Hokkaido-based UH-1H to be retired, by May 2017)
 Training use at Okadama Army Camp (photo from Nov. 2019 [link])
41729  Training use at Kusu Army Camp, Kusu, Oita Prefecture
 (Photo from Oct. 2017 [link])
41731  Training airframe at Fukushima Army Camp, Fukushima Prefecture
 (Photo from Oct. 2017 [link])
41732

 On main gate at Kita-Utsunomiya Army Camp, Tochigi Prefecture
 (Photos from June 2016 [link] and Nov. 2019 [link])

41733

 (Last aircraft built) Tachikawa Army Camp, Tokyo

 (Photos from Sept. 2014 [link] and Sept. 2018 [link])

 Last updated: May 17, 2021

(Photo [41712, July 2020]: JGSDF Makomanai Public Relations via Twitter @CampMakomanaiPR)

The scene in December 2017, when the cocooned UH-1H 41716 is first put in place in front of the
Hirosaki University of Health & Welfare for training and publicity purposes. The banner
along the fuselage
(below) reads Hirosaki University of Health & Welfare,
Faculty of Emergency Medical Science. 

 Retaining a 1st Flight Eastern Army Helicopter Sqn badge on the cockpit door, the aircraft’s nose
is now emblazoned with the internationally recognized snake-and-staff (Rod of Ascelpius) emblem
 of the medical profession, which
(not visible here) is repeated on the rear side of the cabin.
The rear fuselage/tail boom sports the university logo and a Red Cross.

(Photos [top and above]: Hirosaki University of Health & Welfare Student PR Group
via Twitter @hirosakijggkg1)

(Photo [41731, Fukushima Army Camp, Dec. 2019]: Mike Jefferies)

tachikawauh-1hDisplayed near the Tachikawa base museum building in 2013, UH-1H 41709 served actively from
1989 to 2011 but had been replaced by 2017.

Fuji-Bell UH-1J

Serial Location
41804  JGSDF Utsunomiya Army Camp, Tochigi Prefecture
 Last updated: May 17, 2021

According to Japan Ministry of Defense figures, no more than a handful of the 130 UH-1Js built have either been withdrawn from use of are in store. Although the first order for 12 was included in the 1989 budget, it was 1993 that the variant entered service, and the last batch of 16 formed part of the 2007 budget. Accidents at Tachikawa in June 2019 and Asahikawa in February 2020 would at the very least have seen the aircraft involved placed in store for spares (including these days ultimately for potential export) or relegated to instructional airframes.

It can be expected that the pace at which the 1990s veterans are pensioned off will be accelerated as UH-2 deliveries get under way.

In December 2019, rotorless UH-1J 41804 was seen protected against the elements between the
preserved aircraft at the Utsunomiya Army Camp main gate and those along its approach road.
(Photo: Mike Jefferies)

Hughes TH-55J

Serial Last Known Location
61307

 Old Car Center KUDAN, Naraha, Futaba District, Fukushima
 Prefecture (photo from Sept. 2020 [link])


(61313)*

 (Withdrawn from use as instructional airframe at Japan
  Aviation Academy Wajima [JAAW] Noto Airport Campus,
  9-27-7 Sue, Mitsui, Wajima, Ishikawa Prefecture)

61314**

 Instructional airframe (with 61319) at Narita Aeronautics College,
 1842 Toride-Nishino, Toride City, Ibaraki Prefecture

61319**

 (As 61314)

61320

 (As “JA7753”, which was formerly operated until 2006)
 Civil Aviation College, Miyazaki, Miyazaki Prefecture
 (Photo from Oct. 2014 [link])

(61324)***

 (Removed from indoor display at Ishikawa Aviation Plaza,
 Komatsu Airport, Ishikawa Prefecture)
 (Photo from Oct. 2016 [link])

(61326)

 (Removed from Kasumigaura Army Camp Public Information
 Center, Ibaraki Prefecture and scrapped 2019)
 (See May 18, 2014, report on Aviation Museums page)
 (Photos from May 2012 [link]) and May 2018 [link])

(61328)  (Removed from storage hangar at Tokorozawa Aviation Museum,
 Saitama Prefecture, and returned to JGSDF for disposal in 2020)
 (Photo from Oct. 2014 on dedicated museum page [link])
61331**

 Ainoura Army Camp, Sasebo, Nagasaki Prefecture

(61332)*

 (As 61313)

(61333)*

 (As 61313)

(61334)**

 Park at Kiraku Fureai no Oka, Tsukubamirai City, Ibaraki Prefecture
 (photo from Sept. 2013 [link]), returned to JGSDF circa 2015

61335**

 Replaced 61321 at Kita-Utsunomiya Army Camp, Tochigi
 Prefecture (photos from May 2014 [link]) and June 2019 [link])

61336**

 Hachinohe Army Camp, Aomori Prefecture
 (Photo from Jan. 2017 [link], still present early 2019)

(61337)*

 (As 61313)

(61338)*

 (As 61313)

 * In 2017 or 2018, it was discovered that asbestos had been used in the manufacture
    of certain components fitted to this aircraft. Consequently, all five JAAW had
    been carefully dismantled and disposed of by 2019.
 ** To be confirmed but probably disposed of for the same reason as the JAAW fleet.
 *** As with the JAAW aircraft, had to be removed due to the presence of asbestos.
       Taken in January 2020, a photo of the indoor exhibition area at Ishikawa Aviation
       Plaza revealed a vacant space where the TH-55J had once been.

 Last updated: May 13, 2021

tokorozawath-55jThe JGSDF operated 38 TH-55Js in the training role 1972–1995. The stored Tokorozawa
example usually only got to see the public light of day once a year but has now been
removed after the outbreak of “asbestos blight”.

Ainoura Army Camp, Sasebo (Photo [undated]: うみみちvia Twitter @shimabarakko)

As seen in the introductory photo of this helicopter section, this TH-55J has been a long-term
resident at Hachinohe Army Camp but may have already been removed.
(Photo [August 2016]: eule_no via Twitter @eule-no
)

JUST FOR THE RECORD

jaawth-551
(Above and below) Seen in the hangar at Noto Airport are three of the five TH-55Js acquired by the
Japan Aviation Academy Wajima (JAAW). All had to be carefully scrapped due to the belated 
discovery of the presence of asbestos.
(Photo [Jan. 2014] courtesy Masayuki Sakamoto, JAAW)

jaawth-552

(Photo [Oct. 2015}: i北陸 [i-Hokuriku] / Hokuriku region official event and
tourist destination blog [link])

(Photo [Oct. 2015}: i北陸 [i-Hokuriku] / Hokuriku region official event and
tourist destination blog [link])

The writing already on the wall, some of the JAAW TH-55J fleet were allowed out at what would
have been their last open day in October 2018.
(Photo: i北陸 [i-Hokuriku] / Hokuriku region
official event and tourist destination blog [link])

Kawasaki-Bell H-13*

Serial Last Known Location
30003
 (H-13E/Kawasaki-Bell 47D-1) In storage hangar at Tokorozawa Aviation
 Museum, Saitama Prefecture (photo on dedicated museum page [link]) 
30108  (H-13H/Kawasaki-Bell 47G-2)
 Chic Chic Market, Nong Khai, Thailand (Nov. 2018)
 (Formerly at military surplus dealer in Jomtien, Thailand)
 See Bulletin Board story for Nov. 30, 2017

30120  Behind netting in shed at local museum at 36-1 Shimizu, Kota,
 Nukata District, Aichi Prefecture (Aug. 2020)
30124  Dai-ichi Institute of Technology, Kirishima, Kagoshima Prefecture (Oct. 2019)
30213

 Tsudanuma Campus, College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University,
 Chiba Prefecture
 (present Nov. 2019)

30217  (As “30216”) Old Car Center KUDAN, Naraha, Futaba District,
 Fukushima Prefecture (current, photo from Sept. 2020 [link])
30219  Instructional airframe at Narita Aeronautics College,
 Toride City, Ibaraki Prefecture (likely already scrapped)
 * All H-13KH (Kawasaki-Bell 47G3B-KH4) unless otherwise stated.
 Last updated: May 13, 2021

Japan Aviation Academy adAppearing in the August 1981 edition of the now defunct magazine Air World, this ad for the Japan
Aviation Academy shows the small fleet of former-JGSDF H-13 helicopters that were at that time
used by the organization. The ad requests that any prospective new student send in a stamped,
self-addressed envelope to the value of 800 yen to the high school campus in Futaba (now
part of the city of Kai), Yamanashi Prefecture, to receive an admission information pack.

tokorozawah-13Another former NSF aircraft, H-13E 30003 was still present in the
Tokorozawa storage hangar in October 2013.

30213 at the Tsudanuma Campus of Nihon University’s College of Industrial Technology
(Photo [undated]: Chiba SDF Provincial Cooperation Office website [link] accessed Dec. 27, 2020)

Another view of the impostor H-13KH “30216” shown at the start of this helicopter section.
(Photo [Old Car Center KUDAN, Naraha, Dec. 2019]: Warren Hardcastle)

Alec Wilson H-13 ThailandThe former JGSDF 30108 now on display at the Chic Chic Market in Nong Khai, northeastern
Thailand. The aircraft has been painted to resemble a U.S. Army Bell H-13 from
M*A*S*H,
the popular TV comedy-drama series from the 70s/early 80s set during the Korean War.
(Also present at this location, in JGSDF markings, is a strange ex-Thai T-41/O-1 composite.)
(Photo [November 2018]: Alec Wilson)

Kawasaki-Boeing CH-47J Chinook

Serial Last Known Location
52901  Stored at Asaka Army Camp, Saitama Prefecture
 (Photo from June 2013 [link])
52904  Training use minus rotors at Narashino Army Camp, Chiba
 Prefecture (photos from Apr. 2014 [link] [link] and Apr. 2017 [link])
52905  Rotorless at Higashi-Fuji Training Ground, Shizuoka Prefecture
 (Photo from Sept. 2017 [link]) 
52907  Training use at Utsunomiya Army Camp, Tochigi Prefecture
52909

 (Used during Fukushima nuclear plant operations in 2011)
 Instructional use minus rotors at Matsumoto Army Camp, Nagano
 Prefecture (photo from Apr. 2015 [link])

 Last updated: Jan. 14, 2021

Matsumoto Army Camp CH-47J, April 2018
(Photo: すてんがん工@新製品開発中廠 via Twitter @stengunfactory)

Kawasaki-Hughes OH-6D (Part 1/4)

Serial Last Known Location
31121  Rotorless on raised structure for instructional purposes at
 JGSDF Kita-Utsunomiya Aviation School, Tochigi Prefecture
 (Current Apr. 2020, photo from May 2018 [link])

31122
 On indoor display at Mitsu Seiki Co., Ltd., 301 Shimogawai, Awaji,
 Hyogo Prefecture 656-1522 (current)
 (See Feb. 18, 2014, report on Aviation Museums page)
31124  JGSDF Kita-Utsunomiya Aviation School, Tochigi Prefecture
 (Current Apr. 2020, photo from May 2018 [link])
31126  Instructional airframe at Kisarazu Army Camp, Chiba Prefecture
 (Current, photo from Dec. 2019 [link])
31127  Funaoka Army Camp, Shibata Town, Miyagi Prefecture (Apr. 2020)
31129  Kawasaki Heavy Industries Seishin Works, 8-2 Takatsudai 2-Chome,
 Nishi-ku, Kobe, Hyogo Prefecture 651-2271 (Apr. 2020)
31132  JGSDF Kita-Kumamoto Army Camp
 (Current Apr. 2020, photo from Apr. 2019 [link])
31133

 In front of main entrance within grounds of Oji Technical High School,
 6-1 Oji-Honmachi 3-chome, Kitakatsuragi District, Nara Prefecture 636-0012

 (Apr. 2020 and on school’s homepage [link])

31135  On hard-standings, JGSDF Kita-Utsunomiya Aviation School, Tochigi Prefecture
 (Current Apr. 2020, photo from June 2019 [link])
31136  (Tailboom from 31186) Taiwa Army Camp, Kurokawa District, Miyagi Prefecture
 (Apr. 2020, photo from June 2016 [link])
31138  Kasuminome Army Camp, Miyagi Prefecture [link] (Apr. 2020)
(31139)
 Kamishihi Ninki no Sato Park, Eiheiji, Fukui Prefecture (Apr. 2020) 
 (Now removed, see below)
31141  To one side of gate guard area at JGSDF Kita-Utsunomiya Aviation School,
 Tochigi Prefecture, presumably awaiting disposal (Apr. 2020)
31144  (Tailboom from 31193) On roof of construction company building (Apr. 2020)
 44 Takaya, Naka Ward, Kurashiki, Okayama Prefecture 703-8233
31146  Koriyama Army Camp, Fukushima Prefecture (Apr. 2020)
31147  Tokushima Army Camp, Tokushima Prefecture (Apr. 2020)
31148  Shinodayama Army Camp, Izumi, Osaka Prefecture (Apr. 2020)
31149  Yonago Army Camp, Tottori Prefecture (photo from Mar. 2020 [link])
 Last updated: May 13, 2021  / Continued in Part 2 below

utsuoh-6dThe Kawasaki-built OH-6D 31141 now resident at the Kita-Utsunomiya main gate was
delivered to the JGSDF in February 1981.

An anonymous OH-6D (actually 31149) at Yonago Army Camp, Oct. 2014 (Photo: Andy Binks)

(Photo [Nov. 2019]: Warren Hardcastle)

Ninki no Sato Park in Eiheiji, Fukui Prefecture, is where 1981-vintage OH-6D 31139, which had ended its service career at the Kasumigaura Aviation School, had whiled away its days since July 2002. When the above photo was taken, in November 2019, the aircraft was in general need of attention; the front lower left-side cockpit glazing had remained broken since at least the preceding February. A photo accompanying an article on the Mainichi Shimbun website (dated Sept. 7, 2020) showed that first-aid had been crudely administered in the form of tape around the damaged glazing panel by August 2020. The headline, however, ominously stated “Reasons why helicopter is now to be removed”.

Kawasaki-Hughes OH-6D (Part 2/4)

Serial Last Known Location
31151

 Japan Aviation High School, Utsuya, Kai, Yamanashi Prefecture (Apr. 2020)

(31152)  (Tailboom from 31157) Rotor-less display airframe at JGSDF Kasumigaura
 Aviation School, Ibaraki Prefecture (Now removed)
31153  Shizuoka Institute of Science and Technology (SIST), Fukuroi, Shizuoka Prefecture
 (March 2016, replaced by 31225?)
31156  Sendai Army Camp, Miyagi Prefecture (Apr. 2020)
31157  Senzo Army Camp, Itami, Hyogo Prefecture (current Apr. 2020, photo from May 2017 [link])
31161  Japan Aviation Academy Wajima (JAAW) Noto Airport Campus,
 9-27-7 Sue,  Mitsui, Wajima, Ishikawa Prefecture 929-2372
 (Current, another photo, from Apr. 2016 [link])
31162  Instructional airframe (with 31168) at College of Naka-Nippon Aviation,
 Seki, Gifu Prefecture (Nov. 2019)
31163  Chiba Institute of Science (CIS), Choshi, Chiba Prefecture (current)
 (Photo follows Part 3 below)
31168  Instructional airframe (with 31162) at College of Naka-Nippon Aviation,
 Seki, Gifu Prefecture (Nov. 2019)
31172

 Instructional airframe at Tachikawa Army Camp (Nov. 2019)
 (See Bulletin Board story Nov. 16, 2019) 


31173

 Instructional airframe at Tachikawa Army Camp, Tokyo (Nov. 2013)
 (See photos above, at start of Helicopter section)

 Currently on display near base museum (photo from Sept. 2018 [link])

31175

 Jinmachi Army Camp, Higashine, Yamagata Prefecture (Apr. 2020)
 (Photo from Apr. 2016 [link])

 31178   (Tailboom from 31201) Hachinohe Army Camp, Aomori Pref. (Apr. 2020)
31180  (Tailboom from 31174) Japan Aviation High School, Utsuya, Kai City,
 Yamanashi Prefecture (current, photo from Oct. 2016 [link])
31181  JGSDF Yamaguchi Army Camp (current Apr. 2020, photo from Nov. 2018 [link])
31182  Higashi-Tachikawa Army Camp, Tokyo (Apr. 2020)
31183  Officer Candidate School, Maegawara Army Camp, Kurume, Fukuoka
 Prefecture (Apr. 2020)
31188  (Tailboom from 31226) On grass verge display, minus main rotor blades, at
 JGSDF Kita-Utsunomiya Aviation School, Tochigi Prefecture
 (Current Apr. 2020, photo from May 2018 [link])
 Last updated: May 13, 2020  / Continued in Part 3 below

Kasumigaura OH-6DOne of two rotor-less OH-6Ds that were mounted on platforms next to the tower at the Kasumigaura
Aviation School. Their elevated positions enabled trainee pilots to get used to the line of sight from a
hovering helicopter. When OH-6 training ceased, the aircraft were used for display purposes only.
Both were removed in 2015, the other (31170) is now at the Misawa Aviation and Science Museum.

tachikawaoh-6dDelivered in November 1982, this OH-6D was involved in an accident at the Toyohira training
ground in Sapporo on March 12, 1992. As a result, the aircraft was struck off active charge
and ended up on display near the Tachikawa Army Camp base museum.
The aircraft had been replaced by 2017.

jaawoh-6Lacking its main rotor, this OH-6D is now a permanent resident in the hangar at
Japan Aviation Academy Wajima’s Noto Airport Campus.
(Taken in January 2014, photo courtesy Masayuki Sakamoto, JAAW)

OH-6Ds 31162 and 31168 were delivered to the JGSDF in October 1983 and February 1985,
respectively. Long since unable to move under their own power, they have been mounted on
trolleys for ground handling training at Nakanippon Aviation College for
more than a decade.
(Photo [Nov. 2019]: Warren Hardcastle)

Its original fuselage mated with the tail from another aircraft, this composite OH-6D was put out
to grass at Hachinohe Army Camp.
(Photo [31178, Aug. 2016]: eule_no via Twitter @eule-no)

Kawasaki-Hughes OH-6D (Part 3/4)

Serial Last Known Location
31193  (Tailboom from 31221) On grass verge display, still with rotor blades, at
 JGSDF Kita-Utsunomiya Aviation School, Tochigi Prefecture
 (Current Apr. 2020, photo from May 2018 [link])

31195  (Tailboom from 31218) Inside fenced enclosure in park within Kiryugaoka
 amusement park, Miyamotomachi 4-1-1, Kiryu, Gunma Prefecture (Apr. 2020)
31197  (Tailboom from 31214) Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 7-1 Ogigaoka,
 Nonoichi, Ishikawa Prefecture 921-8501 (installed May 2012)
 (Current, photo from Mar. 2020 [link])
31200  Kochi Army Camp, Kochi Prefecture (Apr. 2013)
31201  Aozora (Blue Sky) Nursery School, Tomisato, Chiba Prefecture (Apr. 2020)
31203  Kasuminome Army Camp (current Apr. 2019, photo from Apr. 2016 [link])
31204  East Japan Air Technical School, Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture (Dec. 2019)
31211

 Maruoka Park, 3201 Yokogawacho, Kamino, Kirishima, Kagoshima Prefecture
 (Current Oct. 2019, photo from Aug. 2016 [link])

31214

 Outside Yoshimatsu Sports Hall, Yusui, Kagoshima Prefecture (Oct. 2019)
 (Composite airframe as original tail boom fitted to 31197)

31225

 Shizuoka Institute of Science and Technology (SIST), Fukuroi, Shizuoka Prefecture
 (see 31153), but at JASDF Hamamatsu AB (Sept. 2020 [link]) 

31230

 (Tail from 31267) In playground of Misakikobato Nursery School,
 Funabashi, Chiba Prefecture (current)

31241  Camp Utsunomiya, Tochigi Prefecture (current June 2019, photo
 from June 2016 [link])
31245  (Tail from 31273) Piso Tenjin Nursing Care Centre, Shishikura, Kasumigaura,
 Ibaraki Prefecture (Apr. 2020)
31246  Kokubu Army Camp, Kirishima, Kagoshima Prefecture (Apr. 2020)
31251

 Kokura Army Camp, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka Prefecture

 (Current Apr. 2020, photo from Sept. 2018 [link])

31265  Kasumigaura Army Camp Public Information Center, Ibaraki Prefecture (May 2018)
 Replaced 31212 (See May 18, 2014, report on Aviation Museums page)
 Last updated: May 13, 2020 / Continued in Part 4 below

Two photos of OH-6Ds loaned to educational establishments at opposite ends of Japan’s educational
system in Chiba Prefecture.
(Above) 31230 at the playground of the Misakikobato Nursery School 
in the city of Funabashi, and
(below) 31163 at the Chiba Institute of Science (CIS) in Choshi.
(Photos [undated]: Chiba SDF Provincial Cooperation Office website [link] accessed Dec. 27, 2020)

As is often the case with OH-6Ds, the example at the Kanazawa Institute of Technology is a mixture,
comprising mainly 31197 with the tail boom from 31214.
(Photo [Nov. 2019]: Warren Hardcastle)

31201 OH-6D JGSDFDoctor-Heli emergency medical service helicopters are often seen flying over the Aozora (Blue Sky)
Nursery School that opened in Tomisato, Chiba Prefecture, on April 1, 2011. A former SDF member
involved with the management of the school, which is also close to Narita International Airport, 
thought it would be aspirational for the pupils to have a real helicopter on site. So a request
was submitted and in due course the school rewarded by the presentation of 1988-vintage
OH-6D 31201 previously operated at the JGSDF Aviation School at
Akeno, Mie Prefecture.
(Photo [April 2017]: Warren Hardcastle)

Having also gone on to a second career as a training aid with a civilian organization, OH-6D
31204 was at the East Japan Air Technical School
(EJAIR) in Sendai in December 2019.
(Photo: Warren Hardcastle)

OH-6D 31241 UtsunomiyaFlown by the Sky Hornets display team in 2012, 31241 had been placed on display at Camp
Utsunomiya, Tochigi Prefecture, by April 2014.
(Photo [April 2017]: Warren Hardcastle)

Kawasaki-Hughes OH-6D (Part 4/4)

Serial Last Known Location
31270  Misawa Aviation & Science Museum, Misawa, Aomori Prefecture
 (formerly on platform at Kasumigaura, replaced 31184 June 2015,
 current Oct. 2020 [link])

31276  Higashi-Chitose Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture (April 2020)
31280  Soumagahara Army Camp, Gunma Prefecture (Apr. 2019)
31286  In snow camouflage in hangar at Kasumigaura (May 2017)
31289  Installed close to main gate at JGSDF Hisai Army Camp, Tsu,
 Mie Prefecture, Nov. 2020
31293  Kasumigaura* (March 2020)
31296  Kasumigaura (March 2020)
31297  Kasumigaura (March 2020)
31298  Kasumigaura (last flight with 102nd Sqn at Kisarazu, January 2020)
31299 to 31304  Kasumigaura (March 2020)
31305  Kasumigaura (last flight with 102nd Sqn at Kisarazu, March 2020)
31306  Kasumigaura (last flight with 13th AvSqn at Hofu, March 2020)
31307  Kasumigaura (last flight with 4th AvSqn at Metabaru, March 2020) 
31308  Kasumigaura (last flight with 10th AvSqn at Akeno, March 2020) 
31309  Kasumigaura (March 2020)
31310  Kasumigaura (last flight with 4th AvSqn at Metabaru, March 2020)
31311  Kasumigaura (made last JGSDF OH-6D flight, from Tachikawa, Mar. 25, 2020) 
31312  Kasumigaura (last flight with 10th AvSqn at Akeno, March 2020) 
31313  Kasumigaura (last flight with 12th Sqn at Soumagahara, March 2020)
 * In the run-up to the OH-6D’s withdrawal from service at the end of March 2020, Kasumigaura Army
    Camp served its usual role as a collection point for retired airframes.
 Last updated: Dec. 27, 2020

With the help of a truck-mounted crane, newly arrived OH-6D 31289 is carefully lowered into 
position close to the main gate at JGSDF Hisai Army Camp, Tsu, Mie Prefecture.
(Photo [Nov. 2020]: Asagumo News via Twitter @AsagumoNews52)

Around 60 12th AvSqn personnel were present to bid farewell to 31313—the last of the 193 OH-6Ds
built for the JGSDF—on its last flight, which was from the unit’s base at Soumagahara to the
OH-6D collection point at Kasumigaura Army Camp.

(Photo [Mar. 6, 2020]: JGSDF/12th Brigade Public Relations via Twitter)

Kawasaki-Hughes OH-6J (Part 1/2)

Serial Last Known Location
31009  Nihonbara Army Camp, Okayama Prefecture (Oct. 2017)
31016

 In JMSDF colours 211:8761 at Old Car Center KUDAN, Naraha, Futaba District,
 Fukushima Prefecture (current, photo from Oct. 2016 [link])

31032  Yonago Army Camp, Tottori Prefecture (2017)
31043  JGSDF Betsukai Army Camp, Notsuke District, Hokkaido Prefecture
 (Note that some references give the location as “Bekkai”)
 (Photos from Aug. 2007 to Sept. 2018 [link]) 
31053  Privately owned in Minobu Town, Minamikoma District, Yamanashi Prefecture
 (Current, appeared on Japanese TV programme, April 2016)
31055  Bihoro Army Camp, Bihoro, Hokkaido Prefecture (July 2018)
31058  Formerly used for testing bearingless rotor, on indoor display at Gifu-
 Kakamigahara Air and Space Museum, Gifu Prefecture (see also 31081)
 (Current, photo from Apr. 2018 on dedicated museum page [link])
31065  On indoor display at Tokorozawa Aviation Museum, Saitama Prefecture
 (Current, photo on dedicated museum page [link] and from Dec. 2020 [link])
31075  Instructional airframe at Narita-Tsukuba Aviation College, 1842 Toride-Nishino,
 Toride City, Ibaraki Prefecture 302-0004 (possibly still present)
31081  Forms part of helicopter flight experience exhibit at Gifu-Kakamigahara
 Air and Space Museum, Gifu Prefecture (Apr. 2018 visit [link])
 (Current, photo at the then Kakamigahara Aerospace Science Museum
 Feb. 2013 [link])
31084  Nagano City Youth Science Center, Shiroyama Park, Nagano Prefecture
 (Current, appears on homepage slideshow [link])
31088  On raised structure outside Nagasaki branch office of Kyushu Defense Bureau,
 2-25 Dejima-machi, Nagasaki, Nagasaki Prefecture 850-0862
 (Current, photo from Oct. 2020 [link])
31089  Sangenya Army Camp, Okayama, Okayama Prefecture
 (Current, photos from July 2014 [link] and Oct. 2018 [link])
 Last updated: May 13, 2021 / Continued in Part 2 below

tokorozawaoh-6Still artificially aloft, Tokorozawa Aviation Museum’s OH-6J 31065 ended its 15-year
military service career in February 1989.

OH-6J NihonbaraOne of the very first OH-6Js to enter service with the JGSDF, 31009 was handed over on
March 9, 1969, and remained in service until July 28, 1986. The aircraft has been resident
at Nihonbara Army Camp, Okayama Prefecture, since at least the late 1990s.
(Photo [October 2017]: Hunini via Wikimedia Commons)

Having acquired ex-JGSDF OH-6J 31016, the management at the Old Car Center in Naraha
decided to repaint the aircraft as 8761, which in March 1973 had been the first aircraft of this
type to enter service with the JMSDF.

(Photo [Old Car Center KUDAN, Naraha, Dec. 2019]: Warren Hardcastle)

OH-6J 31053 forms part of a private collection in a bucolic setting in Yamanashi Prefecture.
(Photo [Aug. 2020]: TAKA via Twitter @alice_herb, who uploaded other images of the
collection and a short video of their location here [link])

The OH-6J linked to a hands-on flight experience exhibit in the since early 2018 tenebrous
zone of the Gifu-Kakamigahara Air and Space Museum.

(Photo [Mar. 2019]: Alan Wilson via Wikimedia Commons)

Kawasaki-Hughes OH-6J (Part 2/2)

Serial Last Known Location
31091  Ebino Army Camp, Miyazaki Prefecture (current, photo from May 2017 [link])
31093  On indoor display at Ishikawa Aviation Plaza, Komatsu Airport,
 Ishikawa Prefecture (current, photo from Nov. 2020 [link])
31094  Higashi Nihon Technical School, Sendai AP, Miyagi Prefecture (current?)
31096  Instructional airframe at Department of Aeronautical Engineering,
 Dai-ichi Institute of Technology, Kirishima, Kagoshima Prefecture
 (Current, photos from Aug. 2020 [link])
31103  Displayed inside hangar at Department of Aerospace Engineering,
 Nippon Bunri University, Oita, Oita Prefecture
 (Current, photo from Oct. 2018 [link])    
31104  Ainoura Army Camp, Sasebo, Nagasaki Prefecture (current)
 (See photo on this page, at start of Helicopters section) 
31110  Zentsuji Army Camp, Zentsuji, Kagawa Prefecture
 (Current, photo with wrong [OH-6D] sign from Oct. 2019 [link])
31111  Higashi-Chitose Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture
 (Believed current Apr. 2020, photo from Apr. 2016 [link])
31115

 Kita-Utsunomiya Army Camp, Tochigi Prefecture 
 (Current, photo from June 2019 [link])

 Last updated: May 13, 2021

31103 OH-6J OitaStill bearing the markings of  Hofu-based 13th Squadron, this OH-6J was delivered on February 17,
1977, and withdrawn from use on June 30, 1995. The aircraft reportedly came into the possession
of current owner, Nippon Bunri University in Oita, the following year.
(Photo [April 2017]: Warren Hardcastle)

Providing a comparison with the more recent linked image provided in the listing, this photo shows
OH-6J 31110 at Zentsuji in September 2010.
(Photo: 663highland via Wikimedia Commons)

tachikawaoh-6jHanded over to the JGSDF in February 1976, the former Tachikawa base collection OH-6J
31098 was operating with the 8th Sqn when retired from service in June 1995. Seen here in
November 2013, there was no sign of this aircraft in November 2017.

Kawasaki-Vertol KV-107II Variants (Part 1/2)

Serial Last Known Location
51701  (KV-107II-4) Bihoro Army Camp, Abashiri District, Hokkaido Prefecture
 (with 51741; photos of all aircraft at Bihoro up to July 2018 [link])
51703  (KV-107II-4) Okadama Army Camp, Sapporo, Hokkaido Prefecture
 (Photo from July 2016 [link])
51705  (KV-107II-4) Ainoura Army Camp, Sasebo, Nagasaki Prefecture
 (Photos from Oct. 2014 [link])
51707

 (KV-107II-4) Training use at Higashi-Chitose Army Camp, Hokkaido
 Prefecture (Oct. 2011)

51711

 (KV-107II-4) Kokubu Army Camp, Kirishima, Kagoshima Prefecture

 (Photo from Feb. 2019 [link]) 

51712

 (KV-107II-4) Matsumoto Army Camp, Nagano Prefecture (Apr. 2019)

51717

 (KV-107II-4) Jinmachi Army Camp, Yamagata Prefecture
 (Photos from 2009 and 2013 [link] and Apr. 2016 [link])

51730

 (KV-107II-4) Training use at Jinmachi Army Camp, Yamagata Prefecture
 (Photos from 2009 and 2013 [link])

51734

 (KV-107II-4) In storage hangar at Tokorozawa Aviation Museum,
 Saitama Prefecture (photos from Nov. 2012 [link]; cockpit photo from
 Nov. 2012 [link] and dedicated museum page [link]) 

51735

 (KV-107II-4) Zentsuji Army Camp, Zentsuji, Kagawa Prefecture
 (Photo from Oct. 2019 [link])

51736  (KV-107II-4A) VIP transport, Kisarazu Army Camp Museum, Chiba
 Prefecture (photos from Dec. 2015 [link] and Dec. 2019 [link])
 (See Displayed Aircraft Special Report 3 at foot of page)
51737  (KV-107II-4) Rotorless at Matsudo Army Camp, Chiba Prefecture
 (Photos from Oct. 2011 [link] and Aug. 2020 [link])
51741  (KV-107II-4) Bihoro Army Camp, Abashiri District, Hokkaido Prefecture
 (with 51701; photos of all aircraft at Bihoro up to July 2018 [link])
51742  (KV-107II-4) Yonago Army Camp, Tottori Prefecture

 (Photos from May 2005 [link] and Oct. 2017 [link])

 Last updated: May 13, 2021 / Continued in Part 2 (all KV-107IIA-4) below

Jinmachi KV107Standing out among the blossoming cherry trees at Jinmachi Army Camp in April 2009 is one of 
the two resident KV-107II-4 helicopters.
(Photo: “Crescent moon” via Wikimedia Commons) 

For comparison with the table link to the photo from 2016, this is how the Okadama Army Camp
KV-107II-4 51703 looked in November 2007.
(Photo: 100 yen via Wikimedia Commons)

Matsumoto Army Camp, April 2019 (Photo: コタツvia Twitter @shuka_iizo)

(Above and below) In service from September 1971 to April 1993, the date 51735 took up its
residency at Zentsuji Army Camp is unknown.

(Photos: [top, Sept. 2010] 663highland via Wikimedia Commons;
[above, Apr. 2018] Heavy Strawberry via Twitter @HeavyStrawberry)

Another anonymous Yonago Army Camp resident to match its OH-6D, KV-107II-4 51742
(Photo [Oct. 2014]: Andy Binks)

Kawasaki-Vertol KV-107II Variants (Part 2/2)*

Serial Last Known Location
51801  Nihonbara Army Camp, Okayama Prefecture (Oct. 2017)
51803  Privately owned in Minobu Town, Minamikoma District, Yamanashi Prefecture
 (See text that accompanies photo)
51804  Gifu-Kakamigahara Air and Space Museum, Gifu Prefecture

 (Photos from 2005 and 2014 [link] and Oct. 2020 [link] and on dedicated
 museum page [link])

51805  Beppu Army Camp, Oita Prefecture
51807  Instructional airframe at Shinodayama Army Camp, Izumi, Osaka Prefecture
 (Photo from Apr. 2019 [link])
51808  Training use at Fukushima Army Camp, Fukushima Prefecture
51811  Rotorless training airframe at Hisai Army Camp, Tsu, Mie Prefecture
 (Photo from Apr. 2016, [link])
51812  Funaoka Army Camp, Shibata Town, Miyagi Prefecture
 (Photos from 2010 and 2018 [link])
51814  Shinmachi Army Camp, Takasaki, Gunma Prefecture

 (Photos from 2004, 2011 and 2016 [link] and Nov. 2018 [link])

51815  Kasumigaura Army Camp Public Information Center, Ibaraki Prefecture

 (Photos from Apr. 2002 [link] and May 2017 [link])

 (See May 18, 2014, report on Aviation Museums page)

51816  Mitsu Seiki Co., Ltd., 301 Shimogawai, Awaji, Hyogo Prefecture
 (Photos from Sept. 2010 [link] and Aug. 2016 [link])
 (See Feb. 18, 2014, report on Aviation Museums page)
51817

 Mount Unzen Disaster Memorial Hall, 1-1 Heisei-machi, Shimabara,
 Nagasaki Prefecture (photos from Feb. 2013 [link] and July 2020 [link])
 (See Displayed Aircraft Special Report below)

51818  Crossland Oyabe amusement park, Oyabe, Toyama Prefecture (Feb. 2014)
 (Photo from Aug. 2019 [link], see Displayed Aircraft Special Report 1 below)
 * All KV-107IIA-4
 Last updated: May 13, 2021

Nihonbara KV-107On August 31, 1973, KV-107IIA-4 51801 was the first of this variant to be delivered to the JGSDF
and remained in service until December 2, 1991. The aircraft has been on display at Nihonbara
Army Camp, Okayama Prefecture, at least since the late 1990s. Also home to UH-1B (41508,
just visible to the right in this picture) and OH-6J (31009, see listing above), the base
seems to specialize in preserving early examples of JGSDF aircraft.
(Photo [Oct. 2017]: Hunini via Wikimedia Commons)

(Photo [Minobu Town, Aug. 2020]: TAKA via Twitter @alice_herb, who uploaded other images of
the private aircraft collection and a short video of their location here [link])

(Above) Accepted by the JGSDF in September 1973, 51803 was pensioned off when with the 101st AvSqn in December 1991. At some stage the aircraft was placed on display in the children’s play area of a flower park in the Niihari District of Ibaraki Prefecture; these photos [link] are from March 2009. Although removed the following year, the aircraft’s remnants were eventually acquired and in 2015 added to the private collection in Minobu Town, which featured in a Japanese TV programme in 2016. After a two-year search to replace missing parts, assembly took place in 2017; the red engine cover sections were from a JASDF aircraft.

kakamikv107Its 22-year military career having come to an end late in 1995, this KV-107IIA-4 was present for
the then Kakamigahara Aerospace Museum’s opening in March the following year
(link).

Shinodayama Army Camp’s very own KV-107IIA-4, 51807
(Photo: Oct. 2014] Hunini via Wikimedia Commons)

Displayed Aircraft Special Report
Kawasaki-Vertol KV-107IIA-4 51817,
Mt. Unzen Disaster Memorial Hall, Shimabara, Nagasaki Prefecture

(Photo [Mar. 2020]: まも【ドボ鎮】via Twitter @Kojimamo)

Having joined the JGSDF’s ranks in November 1980 as the penultimate KV-107IIA-4, 51817 soldiered on until February 2002, when its active service days came to an end while assigned to the Western Army Helicopter Squadron.

In 2007, the aircraft was placed on display next to an ex-JGSDF Type 60 armoured personnel carrier (APC) at the then newly built Mt. Unzen Disaster Memorial Hall, close to the Shimabara Reconstruction Arena sport stadium in Nagasaki Prefecture. (Providing a landmark is a huge statue of local Meiji Restoration hero Ryoma Sakuma in typical samurai dress of anachronistically Japan national football team blue and with one foot resting on a football.) The land on which the sports complex and museum were built was reclaimed from that devastated by lava flow when Mt. Unzen erupted and claimed 43 lives on June 3, 1991. Helicopters and APCs of these types were prominent in the protracted rescue, recovery and support operations that lasted until December 1995.

Already sporting its second, green and brown camouflage scheme in July 2016 (link), at some stage thereafter the decision was made to paint both the helicopter and the APC in a to say the least unusual two-tone grey and maroon colour scheme.

Seemingly on standby to repeat their sterling efforts of 30 years ago, the helicopter and APC have
been poignantly positioned facing the peaks of a thankfully tranquil Mt. Unzen.

(Photo [Mar. 2020]: まも【ドボ鎮】via Twitter @Kojimamo)

Piasecki (Vertol) V-44A

Serial Location
50001  JGSDF Obihiro Army Camp, Hokkaido Prefecture (moved from Bihoro Air Park,
 Bihoro, Abashiri District, Hokkaido Prefecture, in Dec. 2016)
50002

 On indoor display at Tokorozawa Aviation Museum, Saitama
 Prefecture (see dedicated museum page [link])

 Last updated: Feb. 27, 2020

jgsdfv-44
Having had a service career that ran from July 1959 to February 1970, V-44A 50002 ended up
becoming one of the original exhibits at Tokorozawa in April 1993.
(Below) The same aircraft
was present when Kisarazu Army Camp opened its doors to the public in October 1979.

(Photo below courtesy Kenju Ohmoto)

h-21kisarazu

Sikorsky H-19C

Serial Location
40001  On indoor display at Tokorozawa Aviation Museum, Saitama
 Prefecture (see dedicated museum page [link])
40012  Derelict at Kawaguchiko Motor Museum, Yamanashi Prefecture
 (See Aug. 29, 2014, report on Aviation Museums page)
 Last updated: Feb. 27, 2020

jgsdfh-19The Sikorsky H-19C on display at Tokorozawa was handed over to the JGSDF on the day the
service was formed, July 1, 1954.

(All photographs on this website are copyright J-HangarSpace 
unless otherwise stated.) 

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Displayed Aircraft Special Report 1
KV-107IIA-4, Crossland Oyabe Park, Toyama Prefecture, 2014

To mark the 60th anniversary of Japan’s Self-Defense Forces, J-HangarSpace conducted a census of retired SDF aircraft.

As part of its inquiries into JGSDF aircraft that have passed into civilian hands, in February 2014 J-HangarSpace contacted the city hall in Oyabe, Toyama Prefecture, from where Crossland Oyabe Park is administered. The approach resulted in the supply of information on and the kind donation of photos of the former JGSDF Kawasaki-Vertol KV-107IIA-4 on long-term display there.

Having acquired a manufacturing licence in 1962, on January 31, 1966, Kawasaki handed over the first of 60 KV-107IIs in three variants that were to see service with the JGSDF. The aircraft on display at Crossland Oyabe (51818) was both the last to be delivered and, in March 2002, the last to be retired.

After amassing 5,500 flight hours in a six-unit service career, the aircraft was stored at the Kanto Region Supply Base at Tsuchiura Army Camp, Ibaraki Prefecture, from where it was transported by road to its current location in late July 2004. A nine-man team from JGSDF Yao was in charge of its reassembly.

kv-107 oyabe1Seen here circa 2012, Crossland Oyabe’s KV-107II is parked at the base of an
imposing observation tower.
(Photo: CROSSLAND OYABE)

A spokesman from Oyabe City Hall informed J-HangarSpace that the aircraft is, strictly speaking, on loan from the JGSDF. This often seems to be the case with ex-JGSDF aircraft on display in public places or used as instructional airframes, for example at flight training academies.

The helicopter offers an added attraction at Crossland Oyabe, which features an observation tower (above) and a huge expanse of grass. Located within the park, the Da Vinci Techno Museum has placed on display one of the helicopter’s two CT58-IHI-140-1 engines. The spokesman also mentioned that the helicopter’s interior is open for viewing by visitors from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on wind and rain-free Sundays and National Holidays, but only from April to early November. A shot looking down on the aircraft is possible from the tower’s panoramic observation deck.

The panoramic deck would also be an excellent vantage point from which to view the annual helicopter festival. Usually held on the last weekend in August*, the flying display involves helicopters operated by the JGSDF, rescue services, and civil operators.

Crossland Oyabe poster 2017

(*) The 2017 Crossland Oyabe Helicopter and Fire/Crime Prevention Festival was held on August 26 and 27.

Please visit http://www.city.oyabe.toyama.jp/cross/ (Japanese only) for more details about the park and its facilities.

kv-107 oyabe2Despite its age and being open to the elements, the Crossland Oyabe KV-107II remains in
good condition.
(Photo: CROSSLAND OYABE)

The Crossland Oyabe aircraft was thus at the start of its static display career when photographed by J-HangarSpace on a visit to Kasumigaura Army Camp, Ibaraki Prefecture, way back in April 2002 (below).

last jgsdf kv-107 (1)

jgsdf kv-107 detailIn 2002, as now, a special marking on the side of the aircraft depicted all the JGSDF units
that had operated the KV-107II.

jgsdf kv-107 cockpitToday, visitors to Crossland Oyabe are granted limited access to the
KV-107II’s cockpit on afternoons from April to November.

Special report photo update. 51818 on a quiet day in November 2019 (Photo: Warren Hardcastle)

kv-107 ct58 (1)

(Above and below) One of 51818′s two CT58-IHI-140-1 turboshaft engines was removed and
placed on display in the lobby of the Da Vinci Techno Museum within Crossland Oyabe park.
(Photos: CROSSLAND OYABE)

kv-107 ct-58 (2)
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Displayed Aircraft Special Report 2
Fuji-Bell UH-1H, Herb World Akita, Yurihonjo, Akita Prefecture (Note: Aircraft removed in 2019)

Herb World Akita 1
(Above and below) When they added popular cartoon characters to the resident UH-1H,
Herb World Akita employees obliterated the national and unit markings but carefully
painted around the serial numbers on the cockpit doors.
(All photos: Herb World Akita)

Herb World Akita UH-1H nose

In early 2014, in the process of searching for information on SDF aircraft that have somehow passed into civilian hands, J-HangarSpace also found references to a cartoon-covered ex-JGSDF Fuji-Bell UH-1H parked among some grape vines in Akita Prefecture. Removed in 2019, the aircraft actually graced Herb World Akita, a shop, craft market, and garden complex in Yurihonjo, Akita Prefecture.

At that time, there was a trend for Japanese towns to merge to gain city status. Up until March 21, 2005, Herb World Akita was located in Nishime, a town of around 6,500 people in Yuri District. The following day, Nishime officially joined four other towns in that part of Akita’s coastal area to form the city of Yurihonjo.

It was during the Nishime town period, now more than 15 years ago, that the word got around that a local JGSDF unit was advertising the loan of a retired helicopter for display purposes.

Herb World Akita 2The aircraft is locked by the JGSDF prior to Herb World Akita closing for the winter on
the first Monday in November.

Another this time ongoing trend has been for localities to adopt measures to boost tourism, and Nishime looked into the possibilities and agreed upon the current site for the helicopter. The thinking was that the rarity value of a play area with a real helicopter would provide a unique selling point. The Herb World Akita facilities are closed from the first Monday in November until the National Holiday that marks the vernal equinox in March. Nevertheless, it was hoped that aircraft would offer an added attraction for the many tourists who flock to the area in the peak spring and autumn seasons. A famous local landmark, Mt. Chokai is visible to the south.

When first installed, the aircraft was still sporting its standard drab green camouflage scheme. To make the helicopter more appealing to children, and for them to derive more enjoyment from its presence, Herb World Akita employees were later allowed to paint popular Pokemon and Doraemon cartoon characters on the aircraft.

Herb World Akita 3
(Above and below) From heard about on the grapevine to parked amid grape vines.
Few would have imagined 41620’s fate when the aircraft entered service in 1975.
For some years, the aircraft had been operated from Kasuminome, Miyagi Prefecture.

Herb World Akita UH-1H tail

Herb World Akita 4Under the terms of the helicopter’s management contract, JGSDF personnel come to
carry out a maintenance check once a year.

Herb World Akita UH-1H cockpitAlthough there were blanks where some of the cockpit instruments once were, Herb World Akita’s
UH-1H did provide some general details. The red panel in front of the
left-hand pilot’s seat shows operating limits.

Herb World Akita UH-1H in springThe aircraft awaits Herb World Akita’s first visitors of 2014. 

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Displayed Aircraft Special Report 3
KV-107II-4A, Kisarazu Army Camp Museum, Chiba Prefecture, September 10, 2017

KV-107 nose Kisarazu

The only one of its kind, the VIP-configured KV-107II-4A 51736 was delivered on March 2, 1972, for a reported cost then of 390.4 million yen. Based on the commercial passenger versions of the type, the aircraft featured larger square instead of circular fuselage side windows and a wider, upgraded forward entrance door and steps.

Two Internet photos show the aircraft in flight at Yokota in November 1986 (link) and in 1994 (link).

JGSDF VIP KV-107II KisarazuThe VIP aircraft is one of those undergoing maintenance at Kisarazu 40 years ago, on
December 24, 1977. 
(Photo: Akira Watanabe)
This Internet photo records a similar scene in September 1974 (link).

KV-107 instrumentsA far better, full-width photo of the instrument panel can be found by scrolling down here (link)
and compared with that fitted to the standard troop-configured aircraft preserved at Mitsu Seiki
(See Feb. 18, 2014, report on Aviation Museums page).

VIP KV-107 interiorThe aircraft was able to accommodate a total of 13 passengers in two cabins, the forward
of which featured a three-seat sofa.

VIP KV-107 interior (2)The hardly luxuriously appointed toilet facilities were installed in a space behind the
rear seats on the starboard side, ahead of the rear cabin door.

The aircraft remained assigned to the 2nd Helicopter Group of the 1st Helicopter Brigade until retired from active service on July 25, 1997, to become an honoured permanent resident at Kisarazu. The sliding doors of its new Kisarazu Army Camp Museum home will still enable the aircraft to be rolled out for special commemorative events, as it has regularly been in the past (as below, in October 2012).

jgsdfvipkv-107

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Notices

Announcements

JASDF
Airshows in 2021
Nov. 3  Iruma
              (Cancelled)
Dec. 5  Nyutabaru

Airshows in 2020
All cancelled

Airshows in 2019
Komaki 2019 poster
Mar. 2  Komaki
Apr. 14  Kumagaya
May 19  Shizuhama
June 2  Hofu-Kita
June 2  Miho
Aug. 4  Chitose
Aug. 25  Matsushima
Sept. 8  Misawa
Sept. 16  Komatsu
Oct. 13  Ashiya
Oct. 20  Hamamatsu
Nov. 3  Iruma
Nov. 9  Komaki
Nov. 10  Gifu 
Nov. 23  Kasuga
Dec. 1  Hyakuri
Dec. 7-8  Naha
Dec. 8  Tsuiki
Dec. 15  Nyutabaru

air-festa-hohu_img2019rs

iruma191103(2)rs

JGSDF
Airshows in 2021
TBA

Airshows in 2020
With exception of
Akeno (only limited
access), all cancelled

Airshows in 2019
narashino1ab2019koukahajimersJan. 13  Narashino
 (paratroop display)
Apr. 13  Kasuminome
Apr. 13  Somagahara
May 12  Takayubaru
June 1  Kasumigaura
June 16  Kita-Utsunomiya
June 23  Okadama
Oct. 6  Metabaru
Nov. 3  Akeno
Nov. 9  Tachikawa
Nov. 17  Naha
Nov. 24  Yao
Dec. 8  Kisarazu

metabaru191006rs

tachikawa191109rs
Tachikawa

JMSDF
Airshows in 2021
TBA

Airshows in 2020
All cancelled

Airshows in 2019
Apr. 27  Atsugi
Apr. 28  Kanoya
May 5  Iwakuni
(joint Friendship Day)
May 18  Maizuru
May 19  Ohmura
July 13-14
          Komatsushima
July 27  Tateyama
Sept. 21  Hachinohe
ozuki191020rs

Oct. 20  Ozuki
Oct. 26 Shimofusa
Nov. 17  Tokushima

oomura190519rs

shimofusa191026rs

(*) Date to be confirmed

(Please note that air show dates are subject to change/cancellation.)

Links

Arawasi banner

Arawasi

The Aviation Historian

Japan Association of Aviation Photo-
graphers
 (JAAP, Japanese only)

Asian Air Arms

Visitors
(from Feb. 2016, earlier shown below)

Visitors to Feb. 2016

Past visitors